Witi Tame Ihimaera Smiler

Te Aitanga a Māhaki, Rongowhakaata, Ngāi Tāmanuhiri, Ngāti Porou, Ngāi Tūhoe, Te Whānau a Apanui

1944 -



Witi Ihimaera was born in Gisborne and educated at Kaiti Primary School, Te Hapara Primary School, Gisborne Intermediate, Te Karaka District High School, Church College of New Zealand and Gisborne Boys' High School. He studied at the University of Auckland and Victoria University and graduated with a B.A. from Victoria University in 1971. Ihimaera worked for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs as a Career Diplomat from 1973-1989 with postings in Canberra, New York and Washington and two years as a New Zealand consul. In 1990 he began lecturing in the English Department of Auckland University where he is now Professor of English.

Ihimaera began writing at the age of seven and published his first story, "The Prodigal Daughter," in the 1961 Gisborne Boys' High School annual magazine. He received encouragement to pursue full-time writing after attending a WEA creative writing workshop led by Barry Mitcalfe in 1969. He became a cadet journalist for the Gisborne Herald, and then worked as a journalist in the Post Office headquarters where he wrote and produced the Wellington Post Office newspaper from 1968-1971. In 1972 he spent a year in England and wrote a collection of short stories entitled Pounamu, Pounamu which was awarded third prize in the 1973 Wattie Book of the Year Award and was winner of the Freda Buckland Literary Award. In 1975 he was awarded the Burns Fellowship at Otago University and wrote a second collection of short stories entitled The New Net Goes Fishing. Subsequent collections of short stories were Dear Miss Mansfield published in 1989, and Kingfisher Come Home: The complete Māori Stories published in 1995.

Ihimaera has written eleven novels, the first of which, Tangi, received the Goodman Fielder Wattie Book Award in 1974. The Matriarch was awarded the 1986 Goodman Fielder Wattie Book Award and a Commonwealth Writers' Prize in 1987, and Bulibasha, King of the Gypsies, saw Ihimaera win the Wattie/Montana Award for the third time, making him the only writer in New Zealand to do so. His novel, The Whale Rider, received the Nielsen BookData New Zealand Booksellers’ Choice Award, and in 2003, the film based on this novel was released and became the winner of the People’s Choice Award at the Toronto Film Festival. Sky Dancer was short listed for the 2004 Commonwealth Writers Prize Best Book in the South Pacific and South East Asian Region.

Along with his novels and short stories, Ihimaera has written children’s picture books, poetry, a play entitled Women Far Walking, which premiered at Wellington’s International Festival of the Arts in 2000 and a considerable number of non-fiction articles, reviews and publications.

Ihimaera has also written libretti for operaIn 1982 Ihimaera was appointed Writing Fellow at Victoria University and worked on the libretto for his first opera, Waituhi: the Life of the Village, which was a collaboration with Ross Harris and was first performed in 1984. Ihimaera went on to write further opera libretti including Tanz Der Schwane, with Ross Harris and premiered in 1994; The Clio Legacy, with Dorothy Buchanan and premiered in 1994; Symphonic Legends, with Peter Scholes and premiered in 1997; and Galileo, with John Rimmer and premiered in March 1998. From opera, Ihimaera turned to ballet and wrote the narrative of The Wedding, which was a major collaboration between Mark Baldwin (choreography), Raymond Hawthorne (dramaturgy), Gareth Farr (music), Tracy Grant (costume and set design) and John Rayment (lighting design), and was performed by the New Zealand Ballet in 2006.

As a major anthologist of contemporary Māori writing, Ihimaera published Into the World of Light with Don Long in 1982, and in the 1990s went on to compile five volumes of Māori writing under the Te Ao Mārama title. Other collections have followed including Where’s Waari? A history of the Māori through short story (2000), and Get on the waka: best recent Māori fiction (2007).

Ihimaera has received many awards for his contribution to New Zealand literature. These include a Scholarship of Letters (1991), the Katherine Mansfield Fellowship (1993), and the QSM for services to the Māori community (1993). In the 2004 Queen’s Birthday honours, he was made a Distinguished Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit. In that same year he received an honorary doctorate from Victoria University and was a recipient of Fulbright New Zealand funding to take up a residency at George Washington University in Washington DC. He is a founder member and former chair of Nga Puna Waihanga, was involved in the establishment of the Māori and South Pacific Arts Council, and has been a founding member of Te Ha - the Māori writer’s society.

"Ask at the Posts of the House (Raupo Publishing Ltd, 2008) was on the longlist for the 2008 Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award.

In 2009, Penguin New Zealand published His Best Stories, a collection of twenty-four stories from the writer's career, chosen by Ihimaera himself. The stories span more than thirty-five years, and showcase his incredible range and originality.

Ihimaera's work of fiction, The Trowenna Sea (Raupo, 2009), tells the story of Maori prisoners sent to Tasmania for opposing the New Zealand government in the 1840s. Convicted of insurrection, Hohepa Te Umuroa and four companions are transported to Hobart. Ismay Glossop and her doctor husband have also come to Tasmania, and their lives intersect with unexpected consequences.

Witi Ihimaera was one of five Arts Foundation of New Zealand Laureates in 2009. Along with Anne Noble, Chris Knox, Lyonel Grant and Richard Nunns he received $50,000, which is to celebrate the laureates' past achievements and invest in their future.

In late 2009 Witi Ihimaera’s novel The Trowenna Sea (Raupo) attracted significant media controversy. Reviewer Jolisa Gracewood identified a number of uncredited passages in the novel that appeared to be extracted unchanged from several historical and academic works.

Gracewood’s allegations appeared in the New Zealand Listener, and quickly became national news. Some media commentators attacked Ihimaera. Karl du Fresne, writing in the Nelson Mail, suggested ‘a cloud of suspicion now hangs over’ his body of work. Auckland University was also criticised by academics from New Zealand and overseas for failing to adequately acknowledge the seriousness of plagiarism. However Lawrence Jones, writing in the Otago Daily Times, acknowledged that while Ihimaera’s plagiarism is inexcusable it only forms a tiny component of the novel and was due to ‘carelessness about sources, excessive haste, and maybe taking a few shortcuts,’ rather than a concerted effort to steal from other authors. He also felt that Ihimaera, ‘as a Māori, a gay man, an award-winning writer and a professor at the University of Auckland, […] is a target for a variety of prejudices,’ and unfortunately these obscured what could have been a productive debate on the nature of plagiarism in post-modern fiction.

The revelation of plagiarism in The Trowenna Sea came two weeks before Ihimaera was due to receive an Arts Foundation Laureate Award. Ihimaera agreed to purchase all unsold copies of The Trowenna Sea and publisher Penguin NZ agreed to buy back retail stock on request.

Witi Ihimaera was also honoured with the premiere Māori arts award Te Tohutiketike a Te Waka Toi at the 2009 Creative New Zealand Te Waka Toi Awards. Ihimaera joined a luminary list of past recipients of Te Tohutiketike a Te Waka Toi including Sir Howard Morrison, Dame Iritana Tawhiwhirangi and the late renowned master carver Pakariki Harrison and esteemed weaver Diggeress Te Kanawa. The premiere award acknowledges the work of individuals who are exemplary in their chosen field of artistic endeavour. Witi Ihimaera will receive this award at a ceremony at his home marae, Rongopai, in January 2010. Ihimaera made the following acknowledgement, 'To be given Maoridom's highest cultural award, well, it's recognition of the iwi. Without them, I would have nothing to write about and there would be no Ihimaera. So this award is for all those ancestors who have made us all the people we are. It is also for the generations to come, to show them that even when you aren't looking, destiny has a job for you to do.'

The fourth edition of Nights in the Garden of Spain was published by Raupo in 2010. Witi Ihimaera was interviewed by Selina Tusitala Marsh in the anthology, Words Chosen Carefully, edited by Siobhan Harvey (Cape Catley Ltd, 2010).

Witi Ihimaera’s twelfth novel The Parihaka Woman was published by Random House in 2011.

The Thrill of Falling, a collection of short stories, was published by Random House in 2012. In these stories Ihimaera continues his exploration of the novella and the long story begun in Ask The Posts of the House (2007) with a new set of intriguing narratives: urban fiction in 'Maggie Dawn'; contemporary comedy in 'We'll Always Have Paris'; the science fiction novella in 'Purity of Ice'; the new genre of conservation fiction in 'Orbis Terrarium'; the different ways of telling history in the title story; and an adaptation into novella, 'One More Night', of Albert Belz's play Whero's New Net, which itself was adapted from stories in Ihimaera's second short story collection, The New Net Goes Fishing (1976).

In late 2014 Witi Ihimaera released the first volume of his memoirs, Māori Boy: A Memoir of Childhood (Random House NZ). It is the first instalment of a journey through Witi Ihimaera’s life, covering his formative years until the age of fifteen.

During an interview aired on Radio New Zealand National, Witi Ihimaera said that he 'had to bite the bullet and take off the veil' when writing memoirs, as the story was not only his but rather one shared by his community. He states, 'It's not just about me. It's about this valley, it's about a Māori story that draws its inspiration from oral traditions. It's about what we were like in the 1940s and 1950s.'

Māori Boy: A Memoir of Childhood won the General Non-Fiction Award at the 2016 Ockham New Zealand Book Awards."



Biographical sources

  • Correspondence from Witi Ihimaera 12 August 1998, and 17 Oct. 2007.
  • Te Ha questionnaire 1992 and interview with Ihimaera in 1993.
  • Contemporary Māori Writing. Selected with an Introduction by Margaret Orbell. Wellington: Reed, 1970.
  • (http://www.bookcouncil.org.nz/writers/ihimaerawiti.html 7 September 2016

    Children's literature

  • "The Pupu Pool." School Journal 3.3 (1974): 4-13. Rpt. in The Magpies Said: Stories and Poems from New Zealand. Ed. Dorothy Butler. Harmondsworth, UK: Kestral Books, Penguin, 1980. 41-46.
  • An evocative account of gathering kai moana and the devastating effects of pollution.
  • "The Best of Everything. (adapted from "Tangi")" Drawings by Murray Grimsdale. School Journal 2.1 (1975): 34-40.
  • A story about the itinerant lifestyle of a family in contract work.
  • "Our Own Place." Illus. Murray Grimsdale. School Journal 2 (1979): 75-80.
  • In this story adapted from Tangi Ihimaera writes an account of the Mahanga family who after many years of moving home because of Rongo Mahanga's itinerant seasonal work finally acquire their own home at Waituhi.
  • The Little Kowhai Tree. Illus. Henry Campbell. Wellington, N.Z.: Huia, 2002.
  • The Whale Rider. Illus. Bruce Potter. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 2005.
  • An adaptation for children of Ihimaera’s novel of the same name.
  • The Amazing Adventures Of Razza The Rat. Illust. Astrid Matijasevich. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 2006.
  • Fiction

  • "The Liar." New Zealand Listener 1 June, 1970: 15. Rpt. in Short Stories by New Zealanders One. Selected and with preface, notes and questions by Phoebe Meikle. Auckland, N.Z.: Longman Paul, 1973. 127-133. Rpt. in N.Z Listener Short Stories. Chosen by Bill Manhire. Wellington, N.Z.: Methuen, 1977. 85-90. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed Publishing, 1995. 367-374.
  • The young narrator recounts the story of his dramatic weight loss.
  • "Queen Bee." New Zealand Listener 29 June, 1970: 12. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed Publishing, 1995. 472-479.
  • A story of sibling rivalry extending into adulthood.
  • "My First Ball." Te Māori: The Official Journal of the New Zealand Māori Council 1.5 (Aug./Sept. 1970): 40-43, 45. Rpt. in My New Zealand: Senior. With a foreword and questions by Bernard Gadd. Auckland, N.Z.: Longman Paul, 1973. 7-14. Rpt. in Pacific Voices: An Anthology of Māori and Pacific Writing. Comp. Bernard Gadd. Auckland: The Macmillan Company of New Zealand, 1989: 80-87. Rpt. in Burning Boats: Seventeen New Zealand Short Stories. Ed. Owen Marshall. Auckland, N.Z.: Longman Paul, 1994. 42-51.
  • This story about Tuta Wharepapa's invitation to a Government House ball exposes the superficialities and tokenism of a high society function.
  • "The Faraway Side of the Hour." Te Māori: The Official Journal of the New Zealand Māori Council 1.6 (Nov./Dec. 1970): 32-33, 37-39. Rpt. and revised as "Tangi." In Contemporary Māori Writing. Selected with an Introduction by Margaret Orbell. Wellington, N.Z.: Reed, 1970. 55-62. Rpt. in Pounamu, Pounamu. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1972. Rpt. 1973. 125-132. Rpt. in Te Māori 5.1 (May 1973): 44-45.
  • A story about Tama Mahana and his process of grieving the death of his father. This story is a precursor of Ihimaera's novel Tangi.
  • "Tangi" Contemporary Māori Writing. Selected with an Introduction by Margaret Orbell. Wellington, N.Z.: Reed, 1970. 55-62. Rpt. in Pounamu, Pounamu. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1972. Rpt. 1973. 125-132. Rpt. in Te Māori 5.1 (May 1973): 44-45. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed Publishing, 1995. 135-142.
  • A revised version of "The Faraway Side of the Hour."
  • "Journey (from work in progress)." Landfall 95 24.3 (Sept. 1970): 230-250.
  • This is an early draft of the first eleven chapters of Ihimaera's novel Tangi, in which Ihimaera powerfully explores the processes of grief experienced by the twenty-two year old narrator, Tama Mahana, on the death of his father.
  • "The Child." New Zealand Listener 7 Sept. 1970: 14. Rpt. in Pounamu, Pounamu. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1972. Rpt. 1973. 107-113. Rpt. in New Zealand Listener Short Stories. Comp. Bill Manhire. Wellington, N.Z.: Methuen, 1977. 91-97. Rpt. in Into the World of Light: An Anthology of Māori Writing. Ed. Witi Ihimaera and D. S. Long. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1982. 232-238. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed Publishing, 1995. 117-123.
  • A poignant story of the special relationship and daily rituals performed by a young child and his grandmother.
  • "The Whale." New Zealand Listener 21 Dec. 1970: 12. Rpt. in Pounamu, Pounamu. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1972. Rpt. 1973. 115-122. Rpt. in Short Stories by New Zealanders: Two. Selected and with preface, notes and questions by Phoebe C. Meikle. Auckland, N.Z.: Longman Paul, 1972. 113-120. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed Publishing, 1995. 125-132.
  • In this story, Ihimaera portrays the pain and sadness of an old kaumatua sitting in the darkness of his meeting house mourning the passing of the old ways and remembering the time when the meeting house was the heart of a thriving and vital community.
  • "One Step Forward Is Two Steps Back." National Education: The Journal of the NZ Educational Institute 53.575 (May 1971): 183-185.
  • A story describing the challenges facing Māori pursuing further education. This story was broadcast on national radio.
  • "Halcyon." Te Ao Hou 69 (1971): 14-23, 42-52.
  • A story about the idyllic holiday of three urbanised Māori children who visit their rural whanau and reconnect with their taha Māori.
  • Pounamu, Pounamu. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1972.
  • In this collection of ten stories, Ihimaera writes of cross-generational relationships in Waituhi and the gradual shift to the cities, death of the old people and the dilemma of Māori youth straddling two cultures. While some stories paint an idyllic view of rural Māori life, others contain undertones of racism, paternalism and the conflict of cultural values. Ihimaera was awarded third prize in the Wattie Book of the Year award for this collection of short stories.
  • "Willie Boy." Short Stories by New Zealanders: Two. Comp. with preface, notes and questions by Phoebe C. Meikle. Auckland, N.Z.: Longman Paul, 1972. 120-124.
  • In this story the narrator goes on a Saturday afternoon drive, and suddenly encounters his childhood best-friend amongst the prisoners working on a prison farm.
  • "A Game of Cards." Pounamu, Pounamu. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1972. Rpt. 1973. 1-5. Rpt. in New Zealand Short Stories. 3rd ed. Ed. Vincent O'Sullivan. Wellington, N.Z.: Oxford University Press, 1975. 231-235. Rpt. in Ten Modern New Zealand Story Writers: Longer Stories And Linked Stories. Selected and with an introduction by Phoebe Meikle. Auckland, N.Z.: Longman Paul, 1976. 155-158. Rpt. in Literary Glimpses of the Commonwealth. Senior Ed. James B. Bell. Toronto: Wiley Publishers of Canada, 1977. 324-331. Rpt. in The Oxford Anthology of New Zealand Writing Since 1945. Chosen by MacDonald P. Jackson and Vincent O'Sullivan. Auckland, N.Z.: Oxford University Press, 1983. 613-616. Rpt. in Some Other Country: New Zealand's Best Short Stories. New edition. Ed. Marion McLeod and Bill Manhire. Wellington, N.Z.: Bridget Williams, 1992. 159-163. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The complete Māori stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed Publishing, 1995. 11-15.
  • Ihimaera presents a humorous portrayal of a warm-hearted old kuia and her circle of fellow card players. Their infectious humour, playful banter and brazen cheating flow right through to Nanny Miro's dying moments.
  • "Beginning of the Tournament." Pounamu, Pounamu. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1972. Rpt. 1973. 7-13. Rpt. in Short Stories by New Zealanders: Two. Comp. with a preface, notes and questions by Phoebe C. Meikle. Auckland, N.Z.: Longman Paul, 1972. 124-131. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed Publishing, 1995. 17-23.
  • A description of the lively camaraderie and relinking of whanau engendered at the annual hockey tournament in Waituhi.
  • "The Makutu on Mrs Jones." Pounamu, Pounamu. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1972. Rpt. in 1973. 15-30. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed, 1995. 25-40.
  • Tawhai recalls a story from his childhood concerning a long-standing dispute between the beautiful widower, Mrs Jones, and the old tohunga, Mr Hohepa.
  • "Fire On Greenstone." Pounamu, Pounamu. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1972. Rpt. 1973. 33-38. Rpt. in Ten Modern New Zealand Story Writers: Longer Stories And Linked Stories. Comp. with an introduction by Phoebe Meikle. Auckland, N.Z.: Longman Paul, 1976. 159-163. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed Publishing, 1995. 43-48.
  • When the home of Nanny Tama burns down in a fire a year after his wife's death, the old man is devastated because the home embodied the heart of whanau, the whanau taonga and Nanny Miro herself.
  • "The Other Side Of The Fence." Pounamu, Pounamu. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1972. Rpt. 1973. 41-61. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed Publishing, 1995. 51-71.
  • A disturbing story of racism in the suburbs.
  • "In Search Of The Emerald City." Pounamu, Pounamu. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1972. Rpt. 1973. 63-67. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed Publishing, 1995. 73-77.
  • Set in the era of the urban drift, this story describes the tension for Māori between staying on family land with its limited and declining work opportunities, and moving to the city with its lure of employment but separation from the life-blood of whanau, marae and ancestral land.
  • "One Summer Morning." Pounamu, Pounamu. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1972. Rpt. 1973. 69-104. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed, 1995. 79-114.
  • A story about the adolescence of Hema Tipene growing up on the family farm.
  • Tangi. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1973. Rpt. as Tangi & Whanau: Two Classic Māori Novels. Witi Ihimaera. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker & Warburg, 1996. Extract rpt. in Te Māori 5.1 (May 1973): 44-45. Extract rpt. in "Stories From the Spring: Events in the lives of Young New Zealanders." School Journal Part 4.2. Wellington, N.Z.: School Publications Branch, Dept of Education, 1979: 75-80. Extract rpt. in The Seventies Connection. Ed. David Hill and Elizabeth Smither. Dunedin, N.Z.: McIndoe, 1980. 158-159. Extract rpt. in Into the World of Light: An Anthology of Māori Writing. Ed. Witi Ihimaera and D. S. Long. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1982. 238-242. Two extracts rpt. in Countless Signs: The New Zealand Landscape In Literature. Comp. Trudie McNaughton. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed Methuen, 1986. 77, 325-326.
  • This novel powerfully explores the deep sentiments of grief experienced by Tama Mahana and his whanau at the death of their father Rongo Mahana. The novel is written in the form of journeys between Wellington and Gisborne, between the past and the present, It spans the urban world of the Pakeha and the rural marae-based world of the Māori. This novel received the Goodman Fielder Wattie Book Award in 1974.
  • "Clenched Fist." Islands 2.2 (Winter 1973): 123-127. Rpt. in The New Net Goes Fishing. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1977. 37-42. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed, 1995. 185-190.
  • This story is set in the era of the emerging Black Power movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s. The story describes the militant Api, and it highlights the different approaches within Māoridom to racism and the struggle for indigenous rights.
  • "Cicada." Te Ao Hou 74 (1973): 5-8. Rpt. in Dear Miss Mansfield: A Tribute to Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp. Auckland, N.Z.: Viking, 1989. 59-63. Rpt. in Tabasco Sauce and Ice Cream: Stories by New Zealanders. Ed. Lydia Wevers. Auckland, N.Z.: Macmillan Company of NZ, 1990. 50-55. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed, 1995. 375-382.
  • A poignant story of a lonely girl's isolation in the city and her identification with a cicada that lands on her windowsill. Ihimaera retells this story in a slightly different version in Dear Miss Mansfield: A tribute to Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp and in the later publications.
  • Whanau. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1974. Rpt. as Tangi & Whanau: Two Classic Māori Novels. Witi Ihimaera. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker & Warburg, 1996. Extract rpt. in Into the World of Light: An Anthology of Māori Writing. Ed. Witi Ihimaera and D. S. Long. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1982. 243-246. Extract rpt. as "From Whanau." In Countless Signs: The New Zealand Landscape In Literature. Comp. Trudie McNaughton. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed Methuen, 1986. 269-270.
  • This novel explores the lives, relationships and ambitions of the inhabitants of the small rural Māori community of Waituhi. Alongside the imperceptible dying away of the old order and encroaching Western values, there are the faint traces of rekindling whanau links and preserving the treasures of the past.
  • "Kingfisher Come Home." My New Zealand: Junior. Comp. Bernard Gadd. Foreword and questions by Bernard Gadd. Auckland, N.Z.: Longman Paul, 1974. 31-35. Rpt. in Pacific Voices: An Anthology of Māori and Pacific Writing. Selected by Bernard Gadd. Auckland, N.Z.: The Macmillan Company of New Zealand, 1989: 32-36. Broadcast by NZBC in 1971. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed Publishing, 1995. 355-359.
  • In this story Ihimaera explores the sense of dislocation experienced by Māori when separated from the aroha and whanaungatanga of their turangawaewae.
  • "Big Brother, Little Sister." Te Ao Hou 75 (1974): 7-15. Rpt. in The New Net Goes Fishing. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1977. 9-26. Rpt. in The Oxford Anthology of New Zealand Writing Since 1945. Comp. MacDonald P. Jackson and Vincent O'Sullivan. Auckland, N.Z.: Oxford UP, 1983. 616-626. Rpt. in The Oxford Book of New Zealand Short Stories. Ed. Vincent O'Sullivan. Auckland, N.Z.: Oxford UP, 1992. 288-300. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed, 1995. 157-174.
  • A gripping portrayal of 'home-alone' children, reconstituted families and escalating household violence. The story was made into a film by Ian Mune and Roger Donaldson in 1986.
  • "Just Between You an' Me." Te Ao Hou 75 (1974): 37-41.
  • A story of a lonely Māori student in London and his preoccupation with a cleaning lady whose sentiments of friendship prove ill-founded.
  • "Catching Up." Te Māori 6.6 (Oct. 1974): 31-32. Rpt. in The New Net Goes Fishing. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1977. 43-62. Rpt. in Short Story International 3.13 (Apr. 1979): 105-123. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed, 1995. 191-210.
  • This story encapsulates the struggle faced by Māori children in their journey through the state education system and traces the education of Jimmy Heremaia, from his earliest days at school to his graduation from university.
  • "Truth." Islands 4.3 (1975): 277-288. Rpt. as "Truth of the Matter." The New Net Goes Fishing. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1977. 119-134. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, 1995. 267-282.
  • A story exposing different perspectives in the case of an assault. These perspectives colour the final judicial ruling.
  • "The Escalator." Koru: The New Zealand Māori Artists and Writers Annual Magazine 1 (1976). np. Rpt. in The New Net Goes Fishing. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1977. 69-75. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed, 1995. 217-223.
  • A story about the impact of the city on a rural Māori family visiting Wellington.
  • The New Net Goes Fishing. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1977.
  • In this collection of eighteen short stories, Ihimaera explores the impact of the city on the Māori. Racism, prejudice, and the rising assertion of Māori self-determinism and reclamation of Māori land rights are all visited in these stories. Ihimaera also writes of the sense of dislocation experienced by urban Māori who are emotionally and spiritually separated form their turangawaewae.
  • "Yellow Brick Road." The New Net Goes Fishing. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1977. 1-7. Rpt. in The Oxford Anthology of New Zealand Writing Since 1945. Comp. MacDonald P. Jackson and Vincent O’Sullivan. Auckland, N.Z.: Oxford UP, 1983. 626-630. Rpt. in New Zealand Short Stories: Fourth Series. Comp. Lydia Wevers. Auckland, N.Z.: Oxford UP, 1984. 148-153. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, 1995. 149-155.
  • This is a continuation of Ihimaera’s story "In Search Of The Emerald City" which was first published in 1972. The story describes young Matiu and his family who are moving away from their family home at Waituhi and going to Wellington. As the family moves, Matiu is reminded of the yellow brick road leading to the Emerald City in the Wizard of Oz; however, when they draw nearer to Wellington, the whole family have misgivings on what they are leaving behind.
  • "Gathering of the Whakapapa." The New Net Goes Fishing. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1977. 27-36. Rpt. in Ten Modern New Zealand Story Writers: Longer Stories and Linked Stories. Comp. with an introduction by Phoebe Meikle. Auckland, N.Z.: Longman Paul, 1976. 164-167. Rpt. in Short Story International 26 (1981): 113-122. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed, 1995. 175-184.
  • When Nanny Tama's house burns down and all the whanau treasures and whakapapa are destroyed, Nanny Tama realises he must rewrite the whakapapa before he dies.
  • "Passing Time." The New Net Goes Fishing. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1977. 63-68. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed, 1995. 211-216.
  • A tough group of street kids who congregate in the railway station attract the attention of Mavis, who works in the railway magazine stall. As Mavis observes them daily her perspective changes from seeing them as a menacing presence in the station to a sad group of young people who are unemployed, homeless, and bored.
  • "The Kids Downstairs." The New Net Goes Fishing. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1977. 76-98. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, 1995. 224-246.
  • A story about racism in the accommodation industry. The story details the experiences of Susan and Rangi Johnson when they arrange to rent a property above a household of transient youth.
  • "A Sense of Belonging." The New Net Goes Fishing. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1977. 99-106. Rpt. in Great Short Stories of Australia and New Zealand. Sydney, Aus.: Reader's Digest, 1980. 25-32. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed, 1995. 247-254.
  • This story looks at the treatment of Māori in the work-place and the underlying prejudices that bring into question Māori efficiency and reliability.
  • "The Greenstone Patu." The New Net Goes Fishing. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1977. 107-118. Rpt. in The Penguin Book of Contemporary New Zealand Short Stories. Ed. Susan Davis and Russell Haley. Auckland, N.Z.: Penguin, 1989: 294-304. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed, 1995. 255-266.
  • A story about the search for a greenstone patu that had been lost for generations, and the wairua of the patu in determining the rightful owner.
  • "Cousins." The New Net Goes Fishing. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1977. 135-146. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed, 1995. 283-294.
  • In this story the narrator mourns the loss of a cousin he barely knew and mourns the fact that both he and Kingi have embraced the Pakeha world at the expense of their own taha Māori.
  • "Tent on the Home Ground." The New Net Goes Fishing. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1977. 147-152. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, 1995. 295-300.
  • Ihimaera revisits the characters George and Api from his short story "Clenched Fist". The story focuses on a lively debate on the power relations in New Zealand society between Māori and Pakeha.
  • "The House with Sugarbag Windows." The New Net Goes Fishing. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1977. 153-164. Rpt. in Into the World of Light: An Anthology of Māori Writing. Ed. Witi Ihimaera and D. S. Long. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1982. 247-255. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed, 1995. 301-312.
  • While attending a function in an exclusive middle class suburb, Watene suddenly recalls the simplicity of his first home and his early ambition to improve his circumstances.
  • "Masques and Roses." The New Net Goes Fishing. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1977. 165-171. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed, 1995. 313-319.
  • Kate's third date with Piri exposes her parents' underlying prejudice toward Māori.
  • "I, Ozymandias." The New Net Goes Fishing. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1977. 172-183. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, 1995. 320-331.
  • This story is a variation on Ihimaera’s story, "Willie Boy", which was published in 1972. It focuses on the narrator’s chance encounter with a childhood friend who has ended up in prison.
  • "The Seahorse and the Reef." The New Net Goes Fishing. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1977. 184-189. Rpt. in Mana: A South Pacific Journal of Language and Literature 2.1 (1977): 51-54. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed, 1995. 332-337.
  • In this story the narrator recalls his rich childhood experiences of gathering kai moana with his family and his father's teaching on the conservation of this food source. This story is based on an earlier story by Ihimaera called "The Pupu Pool" which was published in 1974 in the School Journal.
  • "Return from Oz." The New Net Goes Fishing. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1977. 191-200. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed, 1995. 339-348.
  • This final story in The New Net Goes Fishing is a sequel to the opening story of the collection, "Yellow Brick Road", in which Matiu and his family leave Waituhi and migrate to Wellington in search of employment and financial security. In "Return from Oz" Matiu's father returns to Waituhi after twenty years in Wellington.
  • "Huset Med Sockersacksgardinerna." ["The House With Sugarbag Windows"]. Mellan Tva Varldar: Prosaantologi Med Māori Forfattare. Ed. Bengt Dagrin. [Sweden]: Forfattares Bokmaskin, 1982. 105-114. And "Inte fin nog." 115-120.
  • Two of Ihimaera's short stories were translated into Swedish.
  • Pounamu, Pounamu: Māori edition. Witi Ihimaera. Māori trans. Jean Wikiriwhi. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann. 1986.
  • The Māori translation of Ihimaera's ten stories first published in Pounamu, Pounamu, in 1972.
  • The Whale Rider. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1987. An extract is rpt. as "The 'tragedy' of a baby daughter..." New Zealand Woman's Weekly 17 August 1987: 48-49. Extract rpt. in Te Ao Mārama: Contemporary Māori Writing for Children. Comp. and ed. Witi Ihimaera. Contributing ed. Haare Williams, Irihapeti Ramsden and D. S. Long. Vol. 4: Te Ara o Te Hau: The Path of the Wind. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1994. 103-109. Rpt. in Māori as Te Kaieke Tohora. Na Witi Ihimaera; na Timoti Karetu i whakamāori; na John Hovell nga pikitia. [Auckland, N.Z.]: Reed, c1995. Rpt. by Reed Books, 2002. Rpt. as International Edition. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 2003.
  • A lyrical account of the merging of mythology and realism in the story of Kahu, the whale and Te Tai Rawhiti ancestor Kahutia Te Rangi. There have been numerous reprintings of this novel.
  • Dear Miss Mansfield: A Tribute to Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp. Auckland, N.Z.: Viking, 1989.
  • With this collection of twelve short stories, Ihimaera writes a letter to Katherine Mansfield and a novella entitled "Maata" in which a fictitious researcher examines the biographical data on Maata and her relationship with Mansfield. The thirteen short stories in the latter half of the book are described by Ihimaera as 'variations on Katherine Mansfield stories', and he also includes some variations of his own stories.
  • "Cat and Mouse." Dear Miss Mansfield: A Tribute to Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp. Auckland, N.Z.: Viking, 1989. 64-71.
  • A variation of Ihimaera's short story "Just Between You an' Me" published in Te Ao Hou 75 (1974): 37-41.
  • "The Boy with the Camera." Dear Miss Mansfield: A Tribute to Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp. Auckland, N.Z.: Viking, 1989. 72-78.
  • In this retelling of Katherine Mansfield's "The Woman at the Store", Ihimaera places the story in a contemporary setting with the female protagonist managing a run-down motel and her son using a camera to record his father.
  • "Country Life." Dear Miss Mansfield: A Tribute to Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp. Auckland, N.Z.: Viking, 1989. 89-109.
  • This story of eight chapters describes the lives of various members of the Bell family.
  • "This Life is Weary." Dear Miss Mansfield: A Tribute to Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp. Auckland, N.Z.: Viking, 1989. 115-125.
  • A view of Mansfield's "The Garden Party" taken from the perspective of the family living in one of the small houses below the Sheridans' home.
  • "Summons to Alexandra." Dear Miss Mansfield: A Tribute to Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp. Auckland, N.Z.: Viking, 1989. 136-142.
  • A story of the jealousy between the two sisters.
  • "Royal Hunt before the Storm." Dear Miss Mansfield: A Tribute to Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp. Auckland, N.Z.: Viking, 1989. 148-155.
  • A story about pursuit and compliance in romantic relationships.
  • "The Washerwoman's Children." ibid. 181-191. Rpt. in Listener 12 Aug. 1989: 31-36.
  • In this story, Ihimaera projects the main protagonists of Mansfield's "The Doll's House" fifty years into the future with Elsie Kelvey now working as a judge and Lil living an uneventful life married to a mechanic.
  • The Dream Swimmer. Auckland, N.Z.: Penguin Books, 1997. Extract from chapter 2 rpt. as "Tiana." Commonwealth: Essays And Studies 16.2 (Spring 1994): 10-14.
  • A sequel to The Matriarch, which explores the relationship of Tama Mahana with his mother Tiana.
  • "A Contemporary Kezia." ibid. 79-88. Rpt. in Te Ao Mārama: Contemporary Māori Writing for Children. Comp. and ed. Witi Ihimaera. Contributing ed. Haare Williams, Irihapeti Ramsden and D. S. Long. Vol. 4: Te Ara o Te Hau: The Path of the Wind. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1994. 69-72.
  • In this story twelve year old Kataraina listens to her father's recollections of her childhood and the gruelling childhood of her grandmother.
  • Nights In The Gardens Of Spain. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker & Warburg, an imprint of Reed Publishing, 1995. Rpt. April 1995. Extract rpt. in Te Ao Mārama: Contemporary Māori Writing. Comp. and ed. Witi Ihimaera. Contributing ed. Haare Williams, Irihapeti Ramsden and D. S. Long. Vol. 5: Te Torino: The Spiral. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1996. 238-241.
  • An account of the protagonist's transition from the heterosexual life of a nuclear family to a fully committed homosexual lifestyle.
  • Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed Publishing, 1995.
  • The collected short stories of Ihimaera's Pounamu, Pounamu (1972), The New Net Goes Fishing (1977) and a new collection entitled Kingfisher Come Home.
  • "The Affectionate Kidnappers." ibid. 110-114. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed, 1995. 360-366.
  • Ihimaera presents another perspective of Mansfield's "How Pearl Button Was Kidnapped" when he retells the story from the kidnappers' perspective and demonstrates the different values of the Pakeha and Māori cultures.
  • "His First Ball." ibid. 126-135. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed, 1995. 480-496.
  • A story based on Ihimaera's short story "My First Ball" and Mansfield's "Her First ball", in which the Māori working class protagonist, Tuta, attends his first ball.
  • "On a Train." ibid. 143-147. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed, 1995. 465-471.
  • Frank Saunders, somewhat akin to Katherine Mansfield's character Stanley Burnell, has an adventure during his daily train trip to Wellington.
  • "The Halcyon Summer." ibid. 156-180. Rpt. in Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed, 1995. 421-459. Rpt. in Te Ao Mārama: Contemporary Māori Writing for Children. Comp. and ed. Witi Ihimaera. Contributing ed. Haare Williams, Irihapeti Ramsden and D. S. Long. Vol. 4: Te Ara o Te Hau: The Path of the Wind. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1994. 113-134. Rpt. in Nine New Zealand Novellas. Ed. Peter Simpson. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 2005.
  • This is a variation of Ihimaera's story "Halcyon" which was published in 1971 and describes the holiday of three city children at their cousins' home on the East Coast. The story highlights the city children's separation from their Māori heritage and the struggle of their rural whanau to keep their ancestral land.
  • "Who are You Taking to the School Dance, Darling." Crossing: New Zealand and Australian Short Stories. Ed. Tessa Duder and Agnes Nieuwenhuizen. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed Children's Books, 1995. 71-78.
  • A story about a family coming to terms with a gay sibling.
  • "The Wedding." Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed Publishing, 1995. 383-401.
  • When Piri and Kate decide to marry they embark on a maelstrom of cross-cultural interaction as their respective families come to terms with their new in-laws.
  • "Keeper of the Fire." Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Måori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed Publishing, 1995. 402-408.
  • A story loosely based on Ihimaera's "A Contemporary Kezia." in which Kataraina's father recounts stories about his mother's childhood.
  • "Four on a Bus." Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Måori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed Publishing, 1995. 409-420.
  • A story about the effects of excessive alcohol, loneliness and low self-esteem on a group of alienated Māori youth.
  • "Dustbins." Kingfisher Come Home: The Complete Māori Stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed Publishing, 1995. 497-509. Rpt. in Te Ao Mārama: Contemporary Māori Writing. Comp. and ed. Witi Ihimaera. Contributing ed. Haare Williams, Irihapeti Ramsden and D. S. Long. Vol. 5: Te Torino: The Spiral. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1996. 224-232.
  • A vivid description of the frailties and abuses of human society viewed through the eyes of a young man on the rubbish collection round.
  • "Kansas." Kingfisher Come Home: The complete Māori stories: Pounamu Pounamu, The New Net Goes Fishing, Kingfisher Come Home. Auckland, N.Z.: Secker and Warburg, an imprint of Reed Publishing, 1995. 510-516.
  • A story of the narrator's return to his roots in Waituhi on the occasion of the birth of his grand-daughter and burial of the pito.
  • "Who Are You Taking To The School Dance, Darling." Crossing: New Zealand and Australian Short Stories. Ed. Tessa Duder and Agnes Nieuwenhuizn. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed Children’s Books, 1995. 71-78.
  • The Matriarch. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1986. Extract rpt. in Te Ao Mārama: Contemporary Māori Writing. Comp. and ed. Witi Ihimaera. Contributing ed. Haare Williams, Irihapeti Ramsden and D. S. Long. Vol. 5: Te Torino: The Spiral. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1996. 232-234.
  • An account of the narrator's extraordinary relationship with his grandmother, and an evocation of East Coast history and mythology.
  • Bulibasha: King of the Gypsies. Auckland, N.Z.: Penguin, 1994. Extract rpt. as "from Bulibasha, King of the Gypsies." The Picador Book of Contemporary New Zealand Fiction. Ed. Fergus Barrowman. London: Picador an imprint of Macmillan General Books, 1996. 139-151. Extract rpt. in Te Ao Mārama: Contemporary Māori Writing. Comp. and ed. Witi Ihimaera. Contributing ed. Haare Williams, Irihapeti Ramsden and D. S. Long. Vol. 5: Te Torino: The Spiral. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1996. 234-238.
  • An evocation of an idyllic rural past couched in terms of an ongoing feud between two families.
  • "Short Features." ibid. 460-464. Rpt. in Te Ao Mārama: Contemporary Māori Writing. Comp. and ed. Witi Ihimaera. Contributing ed. Haare Williams, Irihapeti Ramsden and D. S. Long. Vol. 5: Te Torino: The Spiral. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1996. 221-224.
  • A story about the media glorification of the white culture and its impact on Māori youth.
  • "Wiwi (Of if New Zealand Was the Centre of the World)." Homeland. Ed. Frank Stewart. Feature Ed. Reina Whaitiri and Robert Sullivan. Manoa 9.1 Honolulu, HI.: University of Wawai'i Press, 1997. 17-18.
  • Ihimaera writes a clever reversal of French nuclear testing in the Pacific by describing New Zealand nuclear testing on the Ile de Cité in Paris.
  • "The Dream Swimmer from Tiana." Homeland. Ed. Frank Stewart. Feature Ed. Reina Whaitiri and Robert Sullivan. Manoa 9.1 Honolulu, HI.: University of Wawai'i Press, 1997. 18-25.
  • Excerpts from Ihimaera’s novel Tiana in which Ihimaera writes of Hikurangi, the dreams of Tiana concerning impending danger facing her son Tamatea. It also details Tiana’s journey with her ancestral kaitiaki.
  • "Nobody Wanted to be Indians." 100 NZ Short Stories. Ed. Graeme Lay. Birkenhead, North Shore City, N.Z.: Tandem, 1997. 29-30.
  • "Sacrifice to the Volcano God." 100 NZ Short Stories. Ed. Graeme Lay. Birkenhead, North Shore City, N.Z.: Tandem, 1997. 181-182.
  • "A Tale Of Seduction (Or, If Nothing Else Fails, Eat Paua." Span 47 (1998): 72-75.
  • Aroha: Māori-Geschichten Aus Dem Jadeland. Witi Ihimaera. Eggingen, Ger.: Edition Isele, c1999.
  • German translations of various short stories by Ihimaera previously published in English. TIME @ "H:mm" 18:42
  • The Uncle’s Story. Auckland, N.Z.: Penguin, 2000.
  • "Life and Death in Calcutta." Authors' Choice: Leading New Zealand Writers Choose Their Best Stories -- And Explain Why. Ed. Owen Marshall. Auckland, N.Z.: Penguin, 2001. 108-111.
  • Sky Dancer. Auckland, N.Z.: Penguin, 2003.
  • Shortlisted for the 2004 Commonwealth Writers Prize Best Book in the South Pacific and South East Asian Region.
  • Pounamu Pounamu. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, c2003.
  • A rewriting of the stories of Ihimaera’s collection published in 1972.
  • Ihimaera: His Best Stories. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, c.2003.
  • Whanau II: The Anniversary Collection. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 2004.
  • ‘A new version’ of Ihimaera’s second novel.
  • The Rope of Man. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 2005.
  • This is a new rendition of Tangi with a sequel called "The Return".
  • "from Maata." The Colour of Distance: New Zealand Writers in France: French Writers in New Zealand. Ed. Jenny Bornhold and Gregory O’Brien. Wellington, N.Z.: Victoria UP, 2005. 152-155.
  • Ask the Posts of the House. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 2007.
  • The Reed website states that this ‘is a brand new collection of short stories, including five novella-length stories, from the award-winning author of The Whale Rider.’ http://www.reed.co.nz
  • "Meeting Elizabeth Costello." Get On The Waka: Best Recent Māori Fiction. Ed. with intro. By Witi Ihimaera. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed Books, 2007. 90-101.
  • Black Marks On The White Page,” Eds. Witi Ihimaera and Tina Makareti. Auckland, N.Z.: Penguin Random House New Zealand, 2017.
  • A collection of Oceanic stories.
  • De Traum. HIWA: Contemporary Māori Short Stories. Ed. Paula Morris. Consulting Ed. Darryn Joseph. Auckland: Auckland University Press, 2023. 99-105.
  • Music

  • Companions, Let Us Pray Together. Words by Witi Ihimaera and David Clark; music by David Hamilton; accompaniment arranged for 3 stave organ by David Hamilton and Bruce Baker. Auckland, N.Z.: B. Baker, [199?]
  • Waituhi: The Life of the Village. Written in conjunction with composer Ross Harris. Performed at the State Opera House, Wellington, 1984.
  • This large scale opera focuses on the people of a small Māori community near Gisborne and their struggle to preserve the life of their village.
  • Tanz der Schwane. Music by Ross Harris, libretto by Witi Ihimaera.
  • Performed in the Adam Concert Room at Victoria University, 1993.
  • The Clio Legacy. Composition by Dorothy Buchanan. Text by Witi Ihimaera. 1994.
  • An hour-long work with narration, soprano, women's chorus, horn and orchestra.
  • "Waiata Aroha." Best Mates: Gay Writing In Aotearoa New Zealand. Ed. Peter Wells and Rex Pilgrim. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed Books, 1997. 176-183.
  • The libretto from a song cycle which was composed by Rod Biss.
  • Symphonic Legends. Peter Scholes and Witi Ihimaera, premiered 1997.
  • An orchestral composition for children.
  • Galileo. With John Rimmer, premiered in March 1998.
  • Non-fiction

  • "Te Taha Māori (The Māori Side) Belongs To Us All..." New Zealand Bookworld 2 (July 1973): 3-6.
  • Ihimaera provides an overview of contemporary Māori literature.
  • "We Grew up as Part of our People, but Today - No." Te Māori 5.6 (1973): 24-25.
  • Ihimaera writes of his visit and interview with Witarina Harris, secretary of Sir Apirana Ngata. She discusses with him the importance of education, learning te reo Māori and affirming one’s Māori identity.
  • "Conference at Te Kaha." Te Ao Hou 74 (1973): 22-24.
  • A description of the first national conference of the Māori Artists and Writers Society held at Tukaki Marae, Te Kaha, at Queen's Birthday Weekend, 1973.
  • Māori. Wellington. N.Z.: A. R. Shearer, Government Printer, 1975.
  • "Deep South/ Impressions of Another Country." Review 75, OUSA Literary Magazine, 1975. 13-15. Rpt. in Countless Signs: The New Zealand Landscape In Literature. Comp. Trudie McNaughton. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed Methuen, 1986. 316-319.
  • In a series of fragmented paragraphs Ihimaera explores his diverse responses to moving down to Dunedin as a recipient of the Burns writers' fellowship.
  • "The Second Breath." Te Ao Hou 76 (1975): 46-48.
  • Ihimaera writes of the second Māori Artists and Writers' Conference held at Takitimu and Taihoa maraes.
  • "Why I Write." World Literature Written in English 14.1 (Apr. 1975): 116-119. Rpt. in Writers On Writing: An Anthology. Ed. Robert Neale. Auckland, N.Z.: Oxford UP, 1992. 215-216.
  • Ihimaera discusses his writing, subject matter and the unique problems facing Māori writers.
  • "The Māori Landscape." Listener 30 July 1977: 10.
  • In this editorial, Ihimaera writes of the two landscapes in New Zealand - Pakeha and Māori - and observes that while the Pakeha landscape continues to dominate and assert its power over all New Zealanders, the Māori landscape has 'eroded to such an extent that only its emotional aspect, the contours of the spirit and the heart, has been able to survive intact.' Ihimaera maintains that it will require a 'cultural revolution' to bring Māori culture into the light and that this revolution would hinge on New Zealanders realising that they live in a Pacific nation which contains Māori and Pakeha identities.
  • "The Māori Affairs Syndrome." Listener 27 Aug. 1977: 10.
  • A critique of the practice of marginalising Māori issues by relegating them solely to Māori MPs and the Māori Affairs Department. Ihimaera contends that this practice legitimates mainstream governmental agencies shirking their responsibility to Māori citizens and perpetuates the "Keep New Zealand Monocultural" policy. With the massive shift of Māori to the cities, Ihimaera believes that Māori concerns can no longer be considered a separate issue and he argues instead for every government department to develop an understanding of Māori affairs.
  • "The Māori in Literature." Tihe Mauriora: Aspects of Māoritanga. Ed. Michael King. [Wellington, N.Z.]: Methuen, 1978. 80-85.
  • Co-authors Patricia Grace and Witi Ihimaera. Ihimaera writes that although there are two cultural maps of New Zealand: Māori and Pakeha. The Māori map "has eroded" and many New Zealanders are unaware of their "dual cultural heritage". It was for this reason that Ihimaera began to write: "to make New Zealanders aware of their ‘other’, Māori, heritage’. He argues that New Zealanders "must take their Māori personality into account." Ihimaera goes on to discuss the nature of his writing as a Māori writer and the problems he has faced with the "dual responsibility to his craft and his people."
  • "For the Children of this World: Māori Aspirations for Their Children." A Track to Unknown Water: Proceedings of the Second Pacific Rim Conference on Children's Literature. Ed. Stella Lees. Carlton, Victoria 3053 (Aust): Department of Librarianship. Melbourne State College, 1980. 76-79.
  • In this text of Ihimaera's speech at the Second Pacific Rim Conference on Children's Literature, Ihimaera describes the two cultural maps of New Zealand, Māori and Pakeha, and asserts that time is running out in New Zealand to establish a 'bicultural model' for New Zealand youth. For his two daughters of dual Māori and Pakeha descent Ihimaera dreams of a bicultural future where Māori language is taught, where Māori protocol can be accepted into business administration, where the marae form of debate can be incorporated into Parliament, and 'where being Māori is something to be proud of'.
  • "Māori Life and Literature: A Sensory Perception." Turnbull Library Record 15.1 (1982): 45-55.
  • Ihimaera opens his study of Māori literature with the Māori story of creation. He also describes his whakapapa and gives a brief autobiographical statement. He presents a discussion of Māori life and its relationship with the literary tradition. He outlines the broad scope of the oral literary tradition and traces the written tradition of Māori writing in English noting its developments, editorial responses and the contemporary state of Māoridom.
  • "Environment, Security and Identity." New Zealand International Review 9.5 (Sept.-Oct. 1984): 12-15.
  • The text of a dual presentation by Ken Piddington and Witi Ihimaera at the fiftieth anniversary conference of the New Zealand Institute of International Affairs held at Victoria University of Wellington in June 1984. Ihimaera's paper entitled "A 'maui-esque' viewpoint" notes that when the New Zealand Institute of International Affairs was founded in 1934 there was 'no Māori perspective on New Zealand and its role in the world' because the Māori leaders of that time were focussing instead of Māori survival in New Zealand. Ihimaera contends that even today there is still no 'Māori perspective on New Zealand in the world' because New Zealand's history and international policies have been written by Pakeha. Ihimaera considers the impact of a foreign policy that is founded on a Māori or bicultural perspective and suggests that this might have presented a far friendlier face to the Pacific world and Third World.
  • "Holder of the Mirror: Introduction." Whaiora: The Pursuit of Life. Photographs by Ans Westra. Text by Katerina Mataira. Wellington, N.Z.: Allen & Unwin/ Port Nicholson Press with the National Art Gallery of New Zealand, 1985. 5-7.
  • Ihimaera provides a discussion outlining some of the grievances concerning Ans Westra's publication Washday At The Pa, and articulates Māori reaction to the portrayal of Māori stereotypes by Pakeha photographers and television crews. Ihimaera notes that despite Washday At The Pa, Westra has otherwise made a positive contribution in providing 'a continuing and unfolding photographic history of the iwi Māori.'
  • "Doing It." Through The Looking Glass: Recollections of Childhood From 20 Prominent New Zealanders. Selected and introduced by Michael Gifkins. Auckland, N.Z.: Century Hutchinson New Zealand, 1988. 162-168.
  • Ihimaera writes of his childhood years growing up in the 1950s and recounts various episodes in his adolescent years where he sought knowledge but was presented instead with a barrage of guilt and fear.
  • "Te Taura Tangata." 1840-1990: A Long White Cloud? Essays for 1990. Ed. Tom Newnham. Auckland, N.Z.: Graphic Publications in association with Citizens Association for Racial Equality, 1989. 108-111.
  • Using the imagery of te taura tangata, the rope of man, Ihimaera discusses his whakapapa, tribal lands and the confluence of Māori and Pakeha into te taura tangata. Ihimaera writes of growing up in Waituhi, the development of Māori-Pakeha relationships and the importance of pursuing equality and resolving differences by the year 2000.
  • "Two Views of a Pacific Island Nation." New Directions in New Zealand's Foreign Policy. Ed. Hyam Gold. Rpt. in New Zealand 1990: Official Souvenir Publication. Auckland, N.Z.: Dow Publishing, 1990. 143.
  • Two viewpoints of New Zealand by David Lange and Witi Ihimaera. Ihimaera writes that New Zealand lost its Pacific identity with the European colonisation but argues that now 'New Zealand must become more involved, as a Pacific nation, in establishing an overview for all our peoples'. He suggests a caucus of Pacific nations meeting together in accordance with Pacific protocol and 'formalising the collective interdependence of the Pacific nations.'
  • "Karaka." Art New Zealand 60 (Spring 1991): 78-81, 109.
  • Ihimaera provides a comprehensive account of the life and painting of Māori feminist painter Emare Karaka.
  • "The Long Dark Tea-Time Of The South: New Zealand's Search For A Pacific Identity." The South Pacific: Problems, Issues And Prospects. Ed. Ramesh Thakur. Basingstoke: Macmillan. University of Otago, 1991. 133-144.
  • "A Māori Perspective." JNZL: Journal of New Zealand Literature 9 (1991): 53-54.
  • A discussion of Ihimaera's use of history in his fiction.
  • "Keeping It Alive: Towards A Better Understanding Of Nature And Culture In Aotearoa." New Zealand Museums Journal 22.1 (1992): 7-12.
  • Vision Aotearoa: Kaupapa New Zealand. Marie Bell, Vicki Buck, Eddie Durie et al, in conversation with Roslie Capper and Amy Brown and edited by Witi Ihimaera. Wellington, N.Z.: Bridget Williams, 1993.
  • Twenty New Zealanders write their vision for Aotearoa/New Zealand.
  • "From Myths of the Tour." Te Ao Mārama: Regaining Aotearoa: Māori Writers Speak Out. Comp. and ed. Witi Ihimaera. Contributing ed. Haare Williams, Irihapeti Ramsden and D. S. Long. Vol. 2: He Whakaatanga O Te Ao: The Reality. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1993. 88-90.
  • In this extract from Ihimaera's address given at the Lower Hutt Town Hall during the 1981 Springbok Tour, he challenges three myths surrounding the Tour: that bridge building between New Zealand and South Africa is good because New Zealand can demonstrate to the Springboks a harmonious multiracial society; that New Zealand is 'being picked on by the Black African nations because of the Tour; and that apartheid 'could only be dismantled through that country's electorate putting enough pressure on the Government.'
  • Land, Sea & Sky. Text by Witi Ihimaera. Photographs by Holger Leue. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1994.
  • This book of photographs of New Zealand is divided into nine geographical areas with Ihimaera providing a short background of the Māori myths and tribal history of each region accompanied by brief accounts of the settlement, history, geography, and descriptive notes of various photographs.
  • Mask & Mirror: An Artist's Book. Terry Stringer, Witi Ihimaera, Haru Sameshima, and Donna Hoyle. Auckland, N.Z.: IWA/POI, 1994.
  • The Legendary Land. Text by Witi Ihimaera; photographs by Holger Leue; with a foreword by Keri Hulme. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1994.
  • 100 Lovers Taamaki Makaurau. Vol.1. Ed. Witi Ihimaera and Albert Wendt. Auckland, N.Z.: Storytellers Club of Auckland University Students’ Association, 1994.
  • "Povero Rigoletto - Love, Honour and Revenge." Pacific Way: The Inflight Magazine Of Air New Zealand 76 (Sept. 1994): 52-54, 56.
  • Ihimaera previews the Auckland Opera's 1994 production of Verdi's Rigoletto and recalls earlier productions of the opera and comments on the choice of recordings on compact disc.
  • "Nessun Dorma." Pacific Way: The Inflight Magazine Of Air New Zealand 77 (Oct. 1994): 84-86, 88.
  • Ihimaera writes of Puccini's Turandot which the Wellington City Opera performed in October 1994.
  • Aotearoa New Zealand: Faces Of The Land. Photographs by Holger Leue; text by Witi Ihimaera. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1995.
  • "Esultate!" Pacific Way: The Inflight Magazine Of Air New Zealand 86 (Aug. 1995): 62-64.
  • A preview of the Canterbury Opera's 1995 production of Verdi's opera Otello in which Ihimaera recalls other performances and anecdotes of the opera.
  • "Amami Alfredo!" Pacific Way: The Inflight Magazine of Air New Zealand 87 (Sept. 1995): 74-76.
  • A preview of Auckland Opera's 1995 production of La Traviata by Verdi in which Ihimaera recounts the story of La Traviata and its origins in Alexandre Dumas' novel The Lady of The Camellias.
  • "The Singing Suitor." Pacific Way: The Inflight Magazine of Air New Zealand 91 (1 Feb. 1996): 70-72.
  • A preview of Opera New Zealand's 1996 production of Don Giovanni by Mozart featuring Kiri Te Kanawa as Donna Elvira.
  • "D'immenso Giubilo." Pacific Way: The Inflight Magazine of Air New Zealand 94 (May 1996): 54-56.
  • Ihimaera writes a preview of Opera New Zealand's 1996 production of Lucia di Lammermoor by Donizetti. He gives an account of the story and recounts various renditions of the opera noting particularly the mad scene in Act III.
  • "Champagne Katya, Coca-Cola Don." Quote Unquote 35 (May 1996): 7.
  • Review of Katya Kabanova, by Leos Janacek at the Michael Fowler Centre in Wellington and a review of Don Giovanni performed by Opera New Zealand.
  • Beautiful New Zealand. [Text by Witi Ihimaera; photographs by Holger Leue]. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, c.1997.
  • Beautiful South Island of New Zealand. [Text by Witi Ihimaera; photographs by Holger Leue]. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, c.1997.
  • Beautiful North Island of New Zealand. [Text by Witi Ihimaera; photographs by Holger Leue]. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, c1997.
  • Mataora: The Living Face: Contemporary Māori Art. General ed. Sandy Adsett and Cliff Whiting. Ed. Witi Ihimaera. Wellington, N.Z.: David Bateman/Te Waka Toi/Creative New Zealand, 1997.
  • This substantial publication on contemporary Māori art is divided into sections entitled: Wero; Karanga; Whaikōrero; Mataora; He Tirohanga Hou; He Tirohanga Ki Muri; Te Whenua; Te Reo; Te Ahua Whenua; Te Rito o Te Harakeke; Ta Te Tiriti o Waitangi; He Whakaaro; Poroporoaki and Waiata. It concludes with artists' biographies, glossary and index. Extensive photographs of the art work are interspersed by texts by Robert Jahnke and Witi Ihimaera.
  • New Zealand Land of Adventure. Text by Witi Ihimaera and Tim Plant. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1997. Rpt. 1998, 2000.
  • [Catalogue essay] Emily Karaka: Waharoa o Ngai Tai: Friday 21 March-Sunday 20 April 1997, Fisher Gallery. Manukau City, N.Z.: Fisher Gallery, 1997.
  • Ihimaera provides the catalogue essay for this exhibition.
  • This is New Zealand. Text by Witi Ihimaera and Tim Plant. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1998.
  • On Top/Down Under: Photographs Of Unique New Zealanders. Photographs by Sally Tagg; text by Witi Ihimaera. Auckland, N.Z.: HarperCollins, 1998.
  • Growing Up Māori. Edited by Witi Ihimaera. Auckland, N.Z.: Tandem Press, 1998.
  • New Zealand: First To See The Dawn. Text by Witi Ihimaera; photographs by Holger Leue. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, c1999.
  • "A History of New Zealand Literature Through Selected Texts." Writing Wellington: Twenty Years of Victoria University Writing Fellows. Ed. Roger Robinson. Photographs by Robert Cross. Wellington, N.Z.: Victoria University Press, 1999. Rpt. http://www.nzetc.org/tm/scholarly/tei-RobWrit-_N68011.html
  • An abstract for a paper presented at the LALALAND Conference.
  • Out There: Portraits of the Hero Parade. Photographs by Murray Savidan; text by Witi Ihimaera. Auckland, N.Z.: Savidan Productions, 2000.
  • "Going to the Heights of Abraham." Sunday Star Times 2 Jan. 2000: sup. 6-9.
  • Te Ata: Māori Art from the East Coast, New Zealand. Ed. Witi Ihimaera and Ngarino Ellis. Afterword by Katerina Te Hei Koko Mataira. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 2002.
  • "Spinner of Māori Tradition." New Zealand Herald 12 Aug. 2002: B4.
  • "The Gay Tribe: the Writings of Witi Ihimaera." Margaret Meklin. The Gay and Lesbian Review Worldwide January-February, 2003. Rpt. in http://www.geocities.com/meklina/ihimaera.html 9 September 2002. 19 Oct. 2007.
  • Other

  • "Tetahi Ahuatanga O To Tatou Māoritanga." Te Māori 6.6 (Oct. 1974): 15.
  • This is a submission written by Witi Ihimaera and presented by Harry Dansey, Tilly and Tamati Reedy and Ihimaera to the Queen Elizabeth II Arts Council of New Zealand Bill Committee on June 4, 1974. In the submission Ihimaera states that Māori need to be assured that 'the promotion of traditional arts and crafts (the physical aspects of Māoritanga) is included in the aims of the proposed Queen Elizabeth II Arts Bill.' Ihimaera argues for 'Māori representation at all levels of the proposed New Zealand Queen Elizabeth II Arts Council' and that 'a Māori Arts Committee be incorporated within the proposed Queen Elizabeth II Arts Council framework.' Te Māori notes that '[t]he recommendations for promotion of Māori art have since been incorporated into the aims of the Queen Elizabeth II Arts Council.'
  • "Witi Ihimaera." Speaking of Writing...Seventeen Leading Writers Of Australia And New Zealand Fiction Answer Questions On Their Craft. Afterword by Leonie Kramer. Ed. R. D. Walshe. Sydney, Austral.: Reed Education. Published for the English Teachers' Association of New South Wales, 1975. 38-42.
  • In this interview, Ihimaera reveals the process he followed in writing Tangi and Whanau. Ihimaera states that one of the reasons he chose to write novels was "because it was the form that suited [his] intention: to write about Māori people in an expansive way; to show readers what we are like inside, how we feel, how we live, the values and attitudes we have". He also describes his use of Māori literary traditions, such as the repetitive phrases of the chant form, which he employed in Tangi.
  • Into the World of Light: An Anthology of Māori Writing. Ed. Witi Ihimaera and D. S. Long. Auckland, N.Z.: Heinemann, 1982.
  • A collection of poetry and prose by Māori writers representing a survey of literature by Māori published in the 1970s.
  • "Interview with Witi Ihimaera." Mark Williams. Landfall 45.3 (Sept. 1991): 281-297.
  • In this comprehensive interview of Ihimaera by Mark Williams which was recorded in May 1991 in Auckland, Ihimaera discusses various aspects of his writing including his writing kaupapa, the voice in his writing and the reception of his work. He examines definitions of Māori literature and the development of Māori writing during the 1970s-90s and the process of compiling the Te Ao Mārama volumes.
  • Te Ao Mārama: Contemporary Māori Writing. Comp. and ed. Witi Ihimaera. Contributing ed. Haare Williams, Irihapeti Ramsden and D. S. Long. Vol. 1: Te Whakahuatanga O Te Ao: Reflections of Reality. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1992.
  • The is the first of a six-volume anthology of Māori writing in Māori and English since 1980. This volume contains the writing of what the editors describe as the "first generation" of Māori novelists, short story writers, poets, playwrights, biographers and song writers. The anthology includes material written in the ten-year period since 1980, including writing which was not available during the publication of Into the World of Light. This book was a finalist in the 1993 Wattie Book Awards.
  • Te Ao Mārama: Regaining Aotearoa: Māori Writers Speak Out. Comp. and ed. Witi Ihimaera. Contributing ed. Haare Williams, Irihapeti Ramsden and D. S. Long. Vol. 2: He Whakaatanga O Te Ao: The Reality. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1993.
  • A collection of non-fiction work by Māori authors expressing their 'reality of the world' since 1980. The collection is divided into various subject areas including Māori history, Te Tiriti, the 1981 Springbok Tour, Māori Sovereignty, Te Māori, reclaiming the Reo, Mana Wahine, and the politics of culture.
  • Te Ao Mārama: Contemporary Māori Writing. Comp. and ed. Witi Ihimaera. Contributing ed. Haare Williams, Irihapeti Ramsden and D. S. Long. Vol. 3: Te Puāwaitanga O Te Kōrero: The Flowering. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1993.
  • A collection of contemporary Māori writing by a second generation of Māori writers emerging since 1980. These writers have employed a variety of contemporary genres; they write from the margins rather than from the centre.
  • Te Ao Mārama: Contemporary Māori Writing for Children. Comp. and ed. Witi Ihimaera. Contributing ed. Haare Williams, Irihapeti Ramsden and D. S. Long. Vol. 4: Te Ara o Te Hau: The Path of the Wind. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1994.
  • A collection of Māori writing for children written from 1980 and divided into three sections: country life, city life and the marae.
  • Te Ao Mārama: Contemporary Māori Writing. Comp. and ed. Witi Ihimaera. Contributing ed. Haare Williams, Irihapeti Ramsden and D. S. Long. Vol. 5: Te Torino: The Spiral. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1996.
  • This fifth volume in the Te Ao Mārama series is a companion piece to the first and third volumes which contain creative writing of the first and second generations of contemporary Māori writing.
  • "Witi Ihimaera: Back To The Source." Bill Payne. Southern Skies Apr. 1999: 32-35.
  • Where’s Waari? A History Of The Māori Through The Short Story. Ed. Witi Ihimaera. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 2000.
  • Auckland: The City In Literature. Ed. Witi Ihimaera. Auckland, N.Z.: Exisle Pub., 2003.
  • "An Interview with Witi Ihimaera." Andrew Meklin and Margarita Meklin. JAAM: Just Another Art Movement 20 (2003): 6-14. Rpt. in an extended form as "This Magnificent Accident: An Interview With Witi Ihimaera." Contemporary Pacific: a Journal of Island Affairs 16.2 (2004): 357-366.
  • "This Magnificent Accident: An Interview with Witi Ihimaera." Margaret Meklin and Andrew Meklin. The Contemporary Pacific 16.2 (2004): 358-366. Rpt. in http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/contemporary_pacific/v016/16.2ihimaera.html 19 Oct 2007.
  • This interview was conducted by email in August 2002.
  • Get On The Waka: Best Recent Māori Fiction. Edited with an introduction by Witi Ihimaera. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 2007.
  • Papers/Presentations

  • New Zealand Through The Arts: Past And Present. Sir Tosswill Woolaston, Allen Curnow, Witi Ihimaera. Wellington, N.Z.: Friends of the Turnbull Library, 1982.
  • 1981 Turnbull Winter Lectures reprinted from the Turnbull Library Record, May 1982.
  • "Witi Ihimaera’s New Zealand Dreams." Presented on 2 Nov. 2005. http://www.fulbright.org.nz/news/releases/051102-nzdreams.html 19 Oct. 2007.
  • Transcript of Ihimaera’s speech at the National Library’s Auditorium on 2 Nov. 2005.
  • Performing Arts

  • Woman Far Walking. Wellington, N.Z.: Huia, 2000.
  • Premiered in 2000 at Wellington’s International Festival of the Arts.
  • The Wedding.
  • This ballet opened the Royal New Zealand Ballet season in Auckland in March 2006.
  • Poetry

  • "Anytime Is Wrong Time And So Is In-Between Time." Te Māori 6.1 (Dec. 1973-Jan. 1974): 33-36. Rpt. in Pacific Voices: An Anthology Of Writing By And About Pacific People. Ed. Bernard Gadd. Albany: Stockton House, 1977. 53-54. Rpt. in Pacific Voices: An Anthology of Māori and Pacific Writing. Comp. Bernard Gadd. Auckland, N.Z.: The Macmillan Company of New Zealand, 1989: 18.
  • The poem and following article voice the conflicting loyalties and priorities of Māori juggling employment with the responsibilities of whanau, hapu and iwi. The speaker notes wryly that the great events of life rarely fall neatly on public holidays.
  • "Dinner With The Cannibal." Span: Journal of the South Pacific Association for Commonwealth Literature and Language Studies: Postcolonial Fictions. Editor for this Edition: Michéle Drouart. Special Issue in two volumes including SPACALS Conference Proceedings 1.36 (Oct. 1993): 154-155. Rpt. in Te Ao Mārama: Contemporary Māori Writing. Comp. and ed. Witi Ihimaera. Contributing ed. Haare Williams, Irihapeti Ramsden and D. S. Long. Vol. 5: Te Torino: The Spiral. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1996. 219-221.
  • This poem graphically portrays in the language of a cautionary tale the sophisticated yet ruthless dismemberment of Māori rights through the process of colonisation. This poem was presented in Day II at 'Postcolonial Fictions Proceedings of the SPACLALS Triennial Conference (December 9-11, 1992).
  • "Skulls & cannibals." Te Ao Mārama: Contemporary Māori Writing. Comp. and ed. Witi Ihimaera. Contributing ed. Haare Williams, Irihapeti Ramsden and D. S. Long. Vol. 5: Te Torino: The Spiral. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1996. 218-219.
  • A poem about the disturbance of the burial site of a Māori tipuna.
  • "Un Semplice Storia." Te Ao Mārama: Contemporary Māori Writing. Comp. and ed. Witi Ihimaera. Contributing ed. Haare Williams, Irihapeti Ramsden and D. S. Long. Vol. 5: Te Torino: The Spiral. Auckland, N.Z.: Reed, 1996. 83.
  • "L’Ultimo Giorni." Whetu Moana: Contemporary Polynesian Poems in English. Ed. Albert Wendt, Reina Whaitiri and Robert Sullivan. Auckland, N.Z.: Auckland UP, 2003. 80-81.
  • "Oh Numi Tutelar." Whetu Moana: Contemporary Polynesian Poems in English. Ed. Albert Wendt, Reina Whaitiri and Robert Sullivan. Auckland, N.Z.: Auckland UP, 2003. 81-83.
  • Reviews

  • Rev. of Sons for the Return Home, by Albert Wendt. New Zealand Book World 6 (Nov. 1973): 15-16.
  • Rev. of We live by a Lake, by Noel Hilliard. Te Ao Hou 75 (1974): 60-61.
  • "Hurdy Verdi." Quote Unquote 29 (Nov. 1995): 9.Review of Canterbury Opera's performance of Otello, and Auckland Opera's La Traviata
  • Review of Canterbury Opera's performance of Otello, and Auckland Opera's La Traviata.
  • "Te Kooti power." Rev. of Redemption Songs, A Life Of Te Kooti Arikirangi Te Turuki, by Judith Binney. Listener 16 Dec. 1995: 44-45.
  • "Champagne Katya, Coca-Cola Don." Quote Unquote 35 (May 1996): 7.
  • Review of Katya Kabanova, by Leos Janacek at the Michael Fowler Centre in Wellington and a review of Don Giovanni performed by Opera New Zealand.
  • Sound recordings

  • "Willie Boy." Wellington, N.Z.: Radio New Zealand, 1973.
  • 1 audio cassette of Ihimaera's short story narrated by George Henare.
  • "The Wedding." Wellington, N.Z.: Radio New Zealand, 1973.
  • 1 audio cassette of Ihimaera's short story narrated by George Henare.
  • "Period Of Adjustment." Wellington, N.Z.: Radio New Zealand, 1973.
  • 1 audio cassette of Ihimaera's short story narrated by George Henare.
  • "One Step Forward Is Two Steps Back." Wellington, N.Z.: Radio New Zealand, 1973.
  • 1 audio cassette of Ihimaera's short story narrated by George Henare.
  • "Kingfisher Come Home." Wellington, N.Z.: Radio New Zealand, 1973.
  • 1 audio cassette of Ihimaera's short story narrated by George Henare.
  • "In Search Of The Emerald City." Wellington, N.Z.: Radio New Zealand, 1973.
  • 1 audio cassette of Ihimaera's short story narrated by George Henare.
  • "Haka Night." Wellington, N.Z.: Radio New Zealand, 1973.
  • 1 audio cassette of Ihimaera's short story narrated by George Henare.
  • "A Game of Cards." Wellington, N.Z.: Radio New Zealand, 1973.
  • 1 audio cassette of Ihimaera's short story narrated by George Henare.
  • "Cicada." Wellington, N.Z.: Radio New Zealand, 1973.
  • 1 audio cassette of Ihimaera's short story narrated by George Henare.
  • "Beginning Of The Tournament." Wellington, N.Z.: Radio New Zealand, 1973.
  • 1 audio cassette of Ihimaera's short story narrated by George Henare.
  • "The Pupu Pool." (Sound recording). Wellington, N.Z.: Department of Education, LARIC. Unit 2, 1983.
  • 1 audio cassette of the text of Ihimaera's short story published in the School Journal, 3.2, 1974.
  • Witi Ihimaera: A Game Of Cards And Other Stories. Wellington, N.Z.: Learning Media, 1998.
  • 1 audio cassette containing the readings of "A game of cards", "The child", "Yellow brick road", "Beginning of the tournament", and "Bulibasha".
  • Myth and Meaning. Witi Ihimaera and Briar Grace-Smith (N.Z.), John Marsen (Australia) and Fred D’Agular (U.K./Guyana): chaired by Michael King. Recorded from a National Radio broadcast of N.Z. Post Writers and Readers Week, 30 July 2000.
  • I audio cassette.

    Other

  • "'A Watershed Year' For Resolving Racial Issues." Evening Post 1 Sept. 1989: 2.
  • Abrahams, Cecil. "Interview with Witi Ihimaera - December 1979." Chimo (Quebec) 2 (1980): 24-35.
  • Absalom, Irene. "Writers Delve Into Sources Of Inspiration." Christchurch Star 28 April 1990.
  • An article on Witi Ihimaera and Lauris Edmond.
  • Albinski, Nan Bowman. "Glimpses of Childhood." The Edward A. Clark Center for Australian Studies, University of Texas at Austin. International Literature in English: Essays on the Major Writers. Ed. Robert L. Ross. New York: Garland, 1991. xvi.
  • Amery, Mark. "Witi Ihimaera: Stepping Out." Quote Unquote 20 (Feb. 1995): 12-15.
  • Ihimaera speaks of Bulibasha and Nights in the gardens of Spain.
  • Arvidson, K. O. "The Emergence of a Polynesian Literature." World Literature Written in English. 14.1 (Apr. 1975): 91-115. Rpt. in Mana Review 1.1 (Jan. 1976): 28-48. Rpt. in Readings in Pacific Literature. Ed. Paul Sharrad. [Wollongong, Austral.]: University of Wollongong, New Literatures Research Centre, 1993. 20-38.
  • Barrell, Joana. "From Short Stories To Rock Opera." Otago Daily Times 30 Aug. 1989: 30.
  • Baumer, Helen. "Days And Nights In A Golden Tower." New Zealand Education Review 1.23 (4 Oct. 1996): 20.
  • Discussion with Ihimaera on his appointment as Distinguished Creative Fellow, Māori Literature at Auckland University.
  • Beatson, Peter. "Rival Siblings: Māori and Pakeha in Contemporary New Zealand Literature." SPAN: Newsletter of the South Pacific Association of Commonwealth Literature and Language Studies 15 (Oct. 1982): 2-20.
  • Beckmann, Susan. "Language as Cultural Identity in Achebe, Ihimaera, Laurence and Atwood." World Literature Written in English 20.1 (Spring 1981): 117-134.
  • Beckmann, Susan. "Language as Cultural Identity." Language and Literature in Multicultural Contexts. Ed. and Intro. Satendra Nandan. Foreword by James A. Maraj. Suva, Fiji: University of South Pacific, 1983. xviii. 66-78.
  • Beston, J. B. "An Interview with Witi Ihimaera." World Literature Written in English 16.1 (Apr. 1977): 115-125.
  • Beston, John B. "Witi Ihimaera, Māori Novelist in a Changing World." CE&S 3 (1977-78): 19-28.
  • Black, Eleanor. "Lucky To Be Born A Māori." New Zealand Herald 25 Jan. 2003: G1-2.
  • Boniface, Linley. "Witi’s Makeover." Dominion Post 20 Sept. 2003: E12.
  • Brown, Helen. "The Phoenix Effect." Listener 25 Feb. 1995. 28.
  • Ihimaera discusses Nights in the gardens of Spain.
  • Chan, Stephen. "Fast Food, Paranoia And Politics: The New Zealand Novel In 1986." Kunapipi 9.3 (1987): 110-120.
  • Corballis, Richard. "Witi Ihimaera: Literacy Diplomacy." Landfall 33.1 (Mar. 1979): 64-71.
  • Cunningham. Kevin. The New Zealand Novel. Wellington, N.Z.: Department of Education, Learning Media, 1980.
  • Dobson, Diana. "Writer ‘Back Where He Belongs’." Herald (Gisborner) 28 June 2000: 5.
  • "Doctor Witi Ihimaera." Kōkiri Paetae Aug. 2004: 556.
  • "Fellowship Awarded." The Press 29 Oct. 1992: 2.
  • Findlay, Katherine. "Heralding The New Tribe." Mana: The Māori News Magazine For All New Zealanders 9 (Winter 1995): 74-81.
  • Fox, Alistair. "In Search of the Emerald City: The Short Stories of Witi Ihimaera." Pilgrims: New Series 8 (Summer 1980): 88-94.
  • Garrett, Simon. "A Māori Place in New Zealand Writing: Recovery and Discovery in the Novels of Witi Ihimaera." A Sense of Place in the New Literatures in English. Ed. P. Nightingale. St Lucia, Qld, Austral.: University of Queensland Press, 1986. viii. 112-22.
  • "Great Hopes For The Future." Te Māori 5.1 (May 1973): 10.
  • Gregg, Stacy. "Learning To Write." Sunday Star Times 8 Sept. 1996. E: 5.
  • Hansen, Jeremy. "Witi Ihimaera." Metro (Auckland) 163 (Jan. 1995): 124-126.
  • Interview with Ihimaera and a discussion of his book Nights in the gardens of Spain
  • Herrick, Linda. "Finding His True Voice." Sunday Star Times 29 Jan 1995. D: 1-2.
  • Discussion with Ihimaera concerning Nights In The Gardens Of Spain.
  • Hewitson, Michele. "Giggling writer picks over old bones." New Zealand Herald 29 Oct. 2005: A28.
  • Hughes, Shaun F. D. "Pakeha and Māori behind the Tattooed Face: The Emergence of a Polynesian Voice in New Zealand Fiction." Modern Fiction Studies 27.1 (Spring 1981): 13-29.
  • "Ihimaera now invested with Order of Merit." Gisborne Herald 14 Aug. 2004: 5.
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  • McGirr, Michael. "In Short Fiction." The Sydney Morning Herald 23 July 2005: 22.
  • McLean, Gavin (and others). "Books." Revs. of The Uncle’s story, by Witi Ihimaera, Emerald budgies, by Karyn Hay, Neil Finn Once Removed, by Mark Smith and Neil Finn, The Dictionary of New Zealand Biography Volume Five, 1941-1960, edited by Claudia Orange. Evening Post 3 Nov. 2000: 5.
  • Metcalfe, Rowan and Paki Cherrington. Revs. of The Uncle’s Story, by Witi Ihimaera, and He Wai: A Song, by Trixie Te Arama Menzies. Tu Mai: Offering An Indigenous New Zealand Perspective 19 (2000): 27-28.
  • Milne, Jonathan. "Smiling In The Land Of Danger." Dominion 11 Nov. 2000: 27.
  • Noonan, Rosemary. "Red: Reading, Entertainment, Discussion." Booknotes 133 (2001): sup. 2.
  • Riemenschneider, Dieter. "Contemporary Māori Cultural Practice – From Biculturalism Towards A Global Culture." JNZL: Journal of New Zealand Literature 12/19 (2000/2001): 139-160.
  • Sharp, Iain. "Still Smiling." Sunday Star Times 5 Nov. 2000: F2.
  • Wharenati-Sadler, Wairua, Melanie Leaning and David Herkt. "Intimate Friends And Lovers; Takataapui Aotearoa; The Heroes We Need." Express: New Zealand’s Newspaper of Gay Expression 9 Nov. 2000: 11, 16-17, 19.
  • The Uncle’s Story,
  • Connor, John and Laura Kroetsch. Revs. of The Uncle’s Story, by Witi Ihimaera, and Belief, by Stephanie Johnson. "Weekend Books." New Zealand Herald 4 Nov. 2000: 16-17.
  • The Wedding
  • "Ballet To Perform Ihimaera’s New Story." Dominion Post 18 Oct. 2005.
  • Mays, Richard. "Wedding Ballet Serves Up A Kiwiana Dish." Manawatu Standard 31 March 2006: 3.
  • "Witi’s Wedding." Mana: the Māori News Magazine for all New Zealanders 68 (2006): 76.
  • The Whale Rider
  • Clark, Karen. "A Whale Of Imagery In A Tale To Fire Imagination." Waikato Times 16 Jan. 1993: 14.
  • King, Michael. "Metro Books: Awesome Maturity." Metro (Auckland) 7 (July 1987): 214-215.
  • Lomax, Te Ngāhoa, Rāwhiti Bevan-Brown and Anahera Sadler. "Book Reviews." Revs. of The Whale Rider, by Witi Ihimaera. Rev. of Te Araroa: An East Coast Community – A History, by Bob McConnell. Rev. of Te Takoto O Te Whenua O Hauraki: Hauraki Landmarks, by Taimoana Turoa, edited by Te Ahukaramu Charles Royal. Paharakeke 1 (2004): 116-130.
  • Murray, Peter. Te Karanga: Canterbury Māori Studies Association 3.2 (Aug. 1987): 35.
  • Swain, Pauline. "Easy Trip Around The World." The Dominion Sunday Times 18 Oct. 1992: 22.
  • The Whale Rider movie
  • Bilbrough, Miro. "On The Whale’s Back." New Zealand Books 13.5 (2003): sup.3.
  • Matthews, Philip. "Myth Making." Listener 1 Feb. 2003: 18-24.
  • Vision Aotearoa: Kaupapa New Zealand.
  • Cross, Ian. "Books." Evening Post 13 May 1994. 5.
  • Keith, Hamish. "Tunnel Vision." Quote Unquote 12 (June 1994): 29.
  • Lawson, Kirsten; Charmian Smith; Gavin McLean. "Books." Otago Daily Times 2 July 1994. 22.
  • Marsich, Anna. "Reviews." Women's Studies Journal 11.1/2 (Aug. 1995): 185-188.
  • Rowling, Bill. "A Muted Vision." Listener 23 July 1994. 50-51.
  • Whanau
  • King, Michael. New Zealand Bookworld 14 (Feb./Mar 1975): 24-25.
  • Ngata, Whai. "Love of Land and Their People Dominate the Māori Writers." Marae Magazine 1.3 (1974): 44.
  • Rhodes, H. Winston. Landfall 29.2 (1975): 161-164.
  • Whanau II
  • Black, Eleanor and Susan Jacobs. "Books." Revs. Of Bullshit, Backlash And Bleeding Hearts, by David Slack, and Whanau II, by Witi Ihimaera. New Zealand Herald 26 June 2004: Sup.28.
  • Drichel, Simone. "Rebuilding the Wharenui." New Zealand Books 14.4. (2004): 6-7.
  • Henson, Pam (and others). "Books." Dominion Post 17 July 2004: E11.
  • Jones, Lawrence (and others). "Books." Otago Daily Times 28 Aug. 2004: sup. 5.
  • Prentice, Chris. "Weighed By The Burden Of Souls." Listener 7 Aug. 2004: 46-47.
  • Quigley, Margaret. "30 Years On And A Rewrite." Press 10 July 2004: D12.
  • Roger, Warwick. "The Best Of Books & Music: New Zealand Books." North and South 222 (2004): 100-102.
  • Where’s Waari?
  • Locke, Terry (and others). "Books." New Zealand Education Review 5.28 (2000): 11.
  • McEldowney, Dennis (and others). "Weekend Books." New Zealand Herald 9 Sep. 2000.
  • Murray, Stuart. "The Inside Story." New Zealand Books 11.2 (2001): 14-15.
  • Skinner, Robin and Tracie Barrett. "Books & diversions." Rev. of Looking For The Local: Architecture And The New Zealand Modern, by Justine Clark and Paul Walker. Rev. of Where’s Waari? A History Of Māori Through The Short Story, edited by Witi Ihimaera. Otago Daily Times 30 Aug. 2000: 24.
  • Wattie, Nelson. "There’s Something About Māori." Listener 4 Nov. 2000: 59.
  • Woman far Walking
  • "Acclaimed Author’s First Play A ‘Triumph Of The Human Spirit’." Kōkiri Paetae (April 2000): 2720.
  • Cardy, Tom. "Walking The Boards Again." Evening Post 14 July 2001: 9.
  • Dale, Judith. "The State Of Play: ‘Outstanding Aotearoa’ At The New Zealand Festival 2000." Illusions 30 (2000): 36-43.
  • Herrick, Linda. "Tiri, Eternally." Listener 7 July 2001: 52-53.
  • Laracy, Lynne. "Play On Words." Grace: New Zealand (Mar. 2000): 20-21.
  • Hewitson, Michele. "The Family Serpent." New Zealand Herald 31 Jan. 2000: B8.
  • Longmore, Mary. "Warrior Woman." Evening Post 16 Mar. 2000: 11.
  • Discussion with two female characters in Woman far Walking – Rima Te Wiata and Rachel House.
  • Smith, Charmian. "Ihimaera Work Overwhelming." Otago Daily Times 4 Apr. 2002: 26.
  • Nancy Brunning, director of Woman far Walking, talks about the play.
  • Svensen, Rikki. "Memorable Imagery." English in Aotearoa 41 (2000): 83.